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Why billboards and outdoor ads are booming in a smartphone age Bigger, smarter outdoor ads mean more relevant advertising that makes us look up from our phones

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Netflix produces content, namely billions of dollars worth of documentaries, series, and cooking shows every year. But, like any tech firm, it’s also heavily invested in advertising, promotion, and market research. How else would it understand viewers, attract new ones, and give them a sense of the wealth of available shows and movies? When the company was looking to attract new writers, directors, and actors interested in pitching ideas and working for the site, it had plenty of opt...

Netflix produces content, namely billions of dollars worth of documentaries, series, and cooking shows every year. But, like any tech firm, it’s also heavily invested in advertising, promotion, and market research. How else would it understand viewers, attract new ones, and give them a sense of the wealth of available shows and movies?

When the company was looking to attract new writers, directors, and actors interested in pitching ideas and working for the site, it had plenty of options. But the company decided a $150 million billboard buy on the Sunset Strip in Los Angeles was the best way to go. In a world of targeted advertising—in some cases, uncannily and uncomfortably accurate—a big, bold ad, positioned above the street where your desired audience walks by everyday, still delivers results.

“In the entertainment capital of the world—where your waitress could be producing a movie—Netflix chose to buy billboards,” Nancy Fletcher, the president and CEO of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America, told Advertising Week.

A Netflix billboard along Sunset Strip in 2017. The company is one of the top buyers of outdoors advertisement in the U.S. Shutterstock

In a smartphone world, the biggest screens still matter

Netflix’s strategy is being adopted by many of the world’s biggest brands during a resurgence in outdoor advertising. The growth of billboards and digital signage, known within the industry as digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising, comes in large part because of, and not despite, the overall shift towards digital advertising.

Ad targeting, mobile technology, and ad-supported online media mean most of the industry’s audience is buried in their smartphones, clicking past banner displays and skipping pre-roll commercials. But real life has no skipping or ad-blocking. In a world with an abundance of screens, large, uncluttered, mostly static images still have the power to grab our attention. Factor in location and contextual area data, industry advocates say, and you have ads with actual relevance to people’s daily life. Today, four of the 10 largest spenders on billboards are tech firms (Apple, Google, Amazon, and Netflix).

Jen Hensley, president of Link, which runs a network of hundreds of smart kiosks and digital billboards in New York and 15 other cities, told Curbed that the ability to provide neighborhood data sets her company, and other smart digital signage, apart.

“These screens are in a fixed physical location, on a specific street or corner, and around a certain transit access point, which lets us surface information people want and need at that station at that time,” she says.

That’s why this sector has been such a comparative bright spot for advertising in recent years; screens are getting cheaper, and it’s increasingly easy to fill them with dynamic, competitive content. Digital outdoor ad spending has grown 15 percent annually in recent years, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers, 35 percent since 2010, and will overtake traditional outdoor ad spending by 2020. In fact, outdoor ads were the only traditional media category to show growth this year, hitting an estimated $33.5 billion in revenue; the digital variety, which grew 16 percent, was the main driver.

Outdoor signage gets a digital upgrade

It’s easy to mock outdoors ads as the provenance of ambulance-chasing lawyers, but one of the oldest forms of advertising, which came to prominence when highways were first taking shape in the early 20th century, still offers a great return. For every dollar spent on OOH ads, it delivers $5.97 in ROI, 40 percent more effective than digital search, according to research by Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Factor in the wealth of location data enabled by the widespread adoption of smartphones—even older billboards are being outfitted with sensors and tech to help analyze and better target pedestrians—and suddenly there are ways to make physical ads surprisingly nuanced.

Bigger, higher-resolutions screens, as well as better contextualization, mean billboards will become even more effective. We haven’t reached Blade Runner-esque streetscapes just yet, but the increased integration of technology, and programmatic ad buying—computers deciding when and where to place digital ads automatically—means the signs in your city will become more and more interactive, responsive, and relevant.

The Link network in New York allows advertisers to target specific locations, and update ads in real-time as a promotional campaign evolved. Project X, an outdoor media agency, ran ads during a Chicago snowstorm that directed consumers to the nearest Kmart to buy snow shovels.

Big tech has taken notice. Many of the globe’s biggest tech firms are making moves. China’s Alibaba spent $2.2 billion on Focus Media, a Shanghai-based company, as part of a “New Retail” push, an offline-to-online strategy meant to capture the attention of the Chinese middle class.

Google is testing technology in Germany that would apply the company’s expertise in targeted advertising to outdoor ads; with all that location data from Android users, the company can grab extensive demographic data about who passes by particular street corners.

Ad giant Clear Channel’s Radar program uses global positioning data from mobile apps to gain a better understanding of who’s passing by signage. Alexis Ohanian, co-founder of Initialized Capital and Reddit, invested $2.1 million in AdQuick, a startup developing new targeting and measuring tools for outdoor ads, including integrating digital voice assistants so those passing by billboards can “ask” for more information.

“You used to put glue on the back of a piece of paper and stick it up on a wall for a month,” says Link’s Hensley. “Now, what we’re seeing with the advent of digital displays and ubiquity of real-time data about places, weather, and events, we’re able to surface that in a way that’s useful and increases the utility of screens overall.”

Standing out in a digital world

Part of the push into the real world is a response to digital overkill. Many newer brands, especially the current wave of direct-to-consumer companies, have been plastering subways, or setting up physical retail locations, as a means to break out of the “internet silo” and attract new customers.

Another part is the increasing ability to make the public screens we pass by every day more responsive, and therefore more valuable to advertisers, as the outdoor ad world has become more technically savvy to stave off irrelevance.

Google has even started to test its DoubleClick ad technology in London, allowing ad buyers to programmatically purchase ad space on screens above roads, city centers, and transit hubs. Right now, it’s a proof of concept test, attempting to work through some of the tricky issues of measuring impressions and serving appropriately dynamic creative, but there seems to be promise, especially when it comes to responding to real-time events such as flashing ads for a beer company just as workers jump on the train to head home in the evening.

This new generation of smart ads can also get very personal. During Fashion Week this past August, New Balance ads placed in New York’s SoHo neighborhood and outfitted with cameras used computer vision to analyze the outfits of passersby. If an AI system determined there was a particularly stylish outfit, it would flash an image of that particular person under the heading “exception spotted.”

Fighting for a scarce resource, attention

In addition to the expanded investment in new technology to make these new screens more reactive and interactive, there will simply be more outdoor screens to look at.

Established outdoor advertisers, including JCDecaux, Clear Channel, and Lamar, plan to add hundreds of new digital screens in big cities where they operate. California is testing a digital billboard program on its highways that the state estimates could bring in millions every year.

And, perhaps ironically, as we leave more and more data and digital crumbs via our online activities, that data can be utilized to make these outdoor ads more targeted and relevant. Already, firms that operate highway billboards are using mobile data to measure dwell time on our increasingly congested roadways. Research also shows that physical billboards and phones actually work well together. Mobile click-through rates increase 15 percent when supported by OOH ads, according to ad consultancy WARC, and 46 percent of U.S. consumers used a search engine after seeing an OOH ad.

Today’s digital advertising needs to continually strike a balance between being relevant to consumers and lucrative for advertisers, all without violating privacy concerns. Outdoor ads believe they can cut through the clutter.

“What’s going to engage and delight other people?” says Link’s Hensley. “To us, it’s about the commitment to what’s real and what’s local. Link should be a break from technology.”

By Patrick Sisson 

https://www.commb.ca/why-billboards-and-outdoor-ads-are-booming-in-a-smartphone-age/

 

 

 

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1 hr ago

Meet Favour Akoson, Community Administrator for Nustreams Conference & Culture Centre; Ibadan.

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Team Member by Akoson Favour in

About Favour Akoson     Favour Akoson is the Founder/international president  of Young Ambssadors network international.

About Favour Akoson

 

 

Favour Akoson is the Founder/international president  of Young Ambssadors network international.

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17 hrs ago

The Dress: Honoring Tradition

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article by Tosin OGUNBOWALE in

HOW A BRIDE’S CULTURE OR RELIGION MAY INFLUENCE HER WEDDING GOWN   For some, a white wedding gown is traditional. But Western wedding customs are not global and many brides choose a dress style and color white, red, sleeveless or more modest according to their cultural, or religious, traditions.   The Jewish Bride   An Orthodox Jewish bride usually wears white and her collarbone, elbows and knees must be covered, said Rabbi Ari Raskin, the rabbi of c...

HOW A BRIDE’S CULTURE OR RELIGION MAY INFLUENCE HER WEDDING GOWN

 

For some, a white wedding gown is traditional. But Western wedding customs are not global and many brides choose a dress style and color white, red, sleeveless or more modest according to their cultural, or religious, traditions.

 

The Jewish Bride

 

An Orthodox Jewish bride usually wears white and her collarbone, elbows and knees must be covered, said Rabbi Ari Raskin, the rabbi of congregation B’nai Avraham in Brooklyn Heights. “And she must wear a veil.” But, Rabbi Raskin added, it is important for every bride to ask her rabbi for his guidance before buying a dress. “For some rabbis it is O.K. for a woman to wear a jacket over a less modest dress when they are under the huppah,” he added.

“Modesty is part of my life and it was extra important on my wedding day to be mindful of my modesty,” said Arielle Wernick, who was married in May to Yaakov Teles in New Jersey.

Rabbi Daniel Nevins, a Conservative rabbi and the dean of the Rabbinical School at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, said, “although there are no formal guidelines for the Conservative Jewish bride we encourage all people to appreciate the day as a day of holiness.”

A modern, reform Jewish bride may wear whatever she wants, said Rabbi Amy Ehrlich of Temple Emanu-El in Manhattan. She added, “more often than not a bride-to-be asks me if she should cover her shoulders under the huppah. I always say if you ask that question you have the answer. I encourage brides to be mindful of the sanctity of the moment.” A bolero jacket or shawl may be worn over a revealing dress for modesty during the ceremony.

 

The Mormon Bride

 

A Mormon bride must also be modest in her gown; any slits in the skirt have to be sewn up and there are special garments to be worn under the dress for the ceremony inside a Latter-day Saints temple. “L.D.S. brides may wear their wedding dresses through the temple where the sacred ceremony of marriage takes place if these dresses meet the accepted standards: white, high-neck, long sleeved, modest in design and fabric and free of elaborate ornamentation,” said Irene Caso, a Mormon Church spokeswoman.

Nicole Thomas, the founder and chief executive of latterdaybride.com, said the undergarments that must be worn by a woman in the L.D.S. temple, consist of an undershirt type top with short sleeves and a scoop neckline and undershorts that are made of a spandex like fabric making them tight fitting; they end just above the knee.

 

The Roman Catholic Bride

 

Mercedes Lopez Blanco, a spokeswoman for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, said: “There is no official pronouncement regarding attire for brides at Catholic weddings. Marriage is a sacrament in the Catholic Church. It is assumed by Catholics that they would dress appropriately to respect the sacredness of the vows that they are taking. Catholics are aware that they are making a sacred commitment in a sacred place and dress appropriately.”

In St. Patrick’s Cathedral, for example, she said that brides are asked to dress “tastefully” and they always do.

It is important to discuss the wedding dress with the parish priest or pastor at a specific church before buying the dress, as some do have rules. The Church of SS Peter and Paul in Mankato, Minn., require wedding gowns to be “discreet.” Its website says no low-cut dresses, (front or back), no miniskirts, no open midsections and no tightfitting gowns.

 

The Asian Bride

 

Although most Western brides wear white, a traditional Asian wedding dress is red. Often a Chinese bride will wear a Western wedding gown for the ceremony and change into a traditional red wedding dress for the reception. Decorations are usually red, too, as noted on the website modernqipao.com.

“Considering that I’m a first-generation, there was definitely pressure to do things the traditional way,” said Tina Pham, who married Joel Lingat in August at the Emeryville Marina in Emeryville, Calif. Ms. Pham, whose parents are from Vietnam, wore a white wedding dress for the Western ceremony. For the tea ceremony, she said, the bride usually wears a traditional Vietnamese dress, in red, called an áo dài. “The color is significant since it symbolizes luck for the new journey ahead,” she said.

 

The Hindu Bride

 

A Hindu bride wears a brightly colored sari, often red with gold threads. “The sari should be eye catching to the groom and his family,” said Ganapathy Padmanabhar, the public relations officer for the Hindu Temple Society of North America in Queens. “A silk sari in a bright color is worn and there should be lots of fresh flowers around,” he added.

 “I was raised in Washington D.C., but having a traditional wedding in India was an ode to our South Indian roots,” said Shruti Narasimhan, who married Kalyan Gandikota on July 30 in Bangalore, India. “We wanted a traditional Indian wedding, an ode to pre-independant India, but my traditional sari in electric blue was a new-age pop of color,” she said.

 

The Muslim Bride

 

Muslim brides wear long dresses in bright colors or muted ones; usually they are highly decorated or embellished and a hijab or head scarf is traditional. Often a wedding dress comes with a coordinating hijab.

“Thankfully, I did not feel any pressure to adhere to any religious customs, as there aren’t any in Islam,” said Rehana Khatri, who married Saleem Khatri in June 2013. “An Islamic marriage is approached as a contract witnessed by the bride, groom, and their families,” she said. “The customs I did adhere to were cultural, but not foreign as I grew up attending dazzling Pakistani weddings in Florida. I did have to rebel a little bit and go with a blush pink dress instead of the traditional red dress because I always think it’s fun to change what people are expecting the most.”

 

 

 

By Marianne Rohrlich

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/fashion/weddings/the-dress-honoring-tradition.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

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21 hrs ago

Commonly used Wedding dress materials

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Choice of fabric is one of the most important factors that determine the look of any dress – so when it comes to the most important dress in a girl’s life, the wedding dress, there shouldnot be any confusion. You choose the best. Not only best in looks, but the colour, the weave, the drape and the weight of the fabric used should be just right. And then it should fit your budget as well. Then there is the venue and the weather there to consider as well. When you reach a fabr...

Choice of fabric is one of the most important factors that determine the look of any dress – so when it comes to the most important dress in a girl’s life, the wedding dress, there shouldnot be any confusion. You choose the best. Not only best in looks, but the colour, the weave, the drape and the weight of the fabric used should be just right.

And then it should fit your budget as well. Then there is the venue and the weather there to consider as well.

When you reach a fabric store, one look around is enough to make an ordinary man swoon – not in delight; mostly due to sheer bewilderment – so many choices and so many patterns, designs, colours, shades and types. It is enough to make a man go back and cancel the wedding – but not for us, girls. We find delight in choices

Let us delve into the main types of fabric available for making wedding wear

 

1. Chiffon:

This is a delicate, sheer fabric with a very flowing appearance; It is used mostly in layers. Polyester chiffon is the most commonly used chiffon for making wedding gowns. It is very inexpensive but looks great. Silk Crinkled chiffon fabric (silk chiffon) is a lightweight, lightly textured sheer fabric which is very expensive.

 

2. Crepe:

This beautiful fabric with a crinkly appearance has a great drape and is well suited for gowns. It is very soft with a subtle texture. It can be in silk, cotton or polyester. Very lightweight and delicate fabric. Crepe de chine is a soft, thin crepe.

 

3. Silk:

Silk, as you know, is one of the most popular of all fabrics for making wedding dresses and the most expensive. The most recommended fabric among silk for making wedding gowns  are Silk Dupioni, Silk Charmeuse, Shantung, Heavy crepe, Sueded charmeuse, Heavy Charmeuse, Metalasse, Crede de chine, Thai silk, Peu de soi, Organza, Chiffon, Georgette and Taffeta

 

4. Organdy:

This is a sheer cotton fabric with a crispy feel; It wrinkles very fast. It is generally used to make layers in wedding gowns. You can also make petticoats with organdy or use it as a perfect lining.

 

5. English net:

This is a beautiful net fabric which is really soft and has a slight stretch. It is usually used to make veils and accessories in weddings. You can also make lace by embroidering over it. This luxurious net is used as an overlay over other fabrics for a great layering look.

 

6. Rayon:

This fabric is the closest imitation of silk and drapes beautifully. It has a sheen which makes it very attractive and suited for making wedding wear. Cost effective as well so used widely in place of silk. The disadvantage is that it is not durable / long lasting

 

7. Lace fabrics:

Laces is a fabric with open holes made with machine or by hand.  Alencon lace, Allover lace, chantilly lave, Venice Lace – all are favourites of brides to make their wedding gowns.

 

8. Batiste:

This is a very fine thin opaque (almost translucent) fabric mainly used for sewing lining in wedding gowns. It is mostly in cotton but can be in synthetic fibers as well. Swiss batiste is a cotton batiste fabric used in heirloom sewing.

 

9. Satin:

This is a fabric with a glossy face and a dull back; This fabric has excellent flowing drape and hence a very popular choice for making gowns and trains. Satin is not wrinkle free which might be a problem.

Duchess satin (Peau de Soie, Bridal satin) is a high thread count satin fabric with some more weight than regular satin. It has a great dull type of luster on its surface which is very attractive and it is somewhat wrinkle resistant as well. The fabric also has a good drape; All in all a dream fabric for wedding wear sewing. But this fabric is expensive as well. You also get stretch duchess satin which can sew up very well as a body hugging gown. Other satin fabrics like Italian fabric, Poly satin are all good wedding wear fabrics

 

10. Gabardine:

Gabardine is a common fabric used in vintage wedding gowns; This fabric has diagonal lines across its surface. Gabardine is now used to make Jackets and trousers

 

11. Organza:

A delicate, sheer and crisp fabric very similar to organdy. Glass organza has a great shine to it.

 

12. Georgette:

This is a very flowy sheer fabric with a great drape. it looks a lot like crepe with its crinkly look and texture. Georgette is lighter than crepe though.

 

13. Polyester:

An expensive polyester can very well work as a wedding dress material. Infact it can even look like silk. Polyester satin is used in wedding sewing because of its inexpensiveness

 

14. Velvet:

This is a very thick and soft fabric with a piled surface and flat underside. Crushed velvet refers to velvet fabric with a crushed look or patterned look.

 

15. Sequined and beaded fabric:

This is an oft-used fabric because of the embellishments and glittery opulence.

 

16. Damask:

This is a fabric which looks like brocade but it is lighter than brocade and the raised designs are of the same colour as the fabric. It is used to make the bodices of wedding gowns

https://sewguide.com/wedding-dress-fabrics/

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1 day ago

Step by Step Guide to Plan a Lavish Incentive Trip for Corporate Employees

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article by Tosin OGUNBOWALE in

An incentive trip is a reward to motivate and reward the employees of a company or its clients. It is a planned activity which seeks to create and encourage relationships of a group or rewarding a job well done. It is a good way to promote the loyalty of both, customers and workers, promote the values associated to the company, connect departments or promote and reward the achievement of sales targets. An incentive trip must be unique, creative and playful. They can be fo...

An incentive trip is a reward to motivate and reward the employees of a company or its clients. It is a planned activity which seeks to create and encourage relationships of a group or rewarding a job well done.

It is a good way to promote the loyalty of both, customers and workers, promote the values associated to the company, connect departments or promote and reward the achievement of sales targets.

An incentive trip must be unique, creative and playful. They can be focused on sports and group activities. It is a perfect choice if you are looking to promote teamwork and competitive spirit. They can also revolve around cultural themes or just be a luxury trip.

 

Is your company looking forward to rewarding or motivating employees by taking them on a lavish incentive trip? And being the Human Resource Manager you have the responsibility to meet the expectations of the management? Apparently, it is no easy task to organize an event without breaking a sweat that too when it comes to luxury incentive trips but then we believe every good thing needs efforts and careful planning. So, here we are, writing a comprehensible step by step guide on planning a perfect lavish incentive trip for the corporate employees that will not only make things easy for you but also win you accolades from your colleagues and managers.

 

Step 1: Determine What Do Your Employees Enjoy

 

 

Since there is a world of opportunities outside your corporate office when it comes to travel and tour, you must determine what would appeal more to a larger percentage (obviously, it is difficult to fulfill everyone’s need) of the employees during an incentive event. You can conduct paper surveys/one-on-one rounds to learn about what is there on their bucket list that you can help them cross off. The key is to make them feel special on an incentive trip and to motivate them to outperform each time, which is why the event should have fun components that can only be determined best when you ask them in person.

 

Step 2: Set Your Budget For the Incentive Trip

 

 

After determining what your employees would like to indulge in, it’s time to set the budget for the incentive event. The hospitality industry is vast, and one high-end service can have varied prices, therefore it is important to first fix your budget in order to determine where you will go and how much you should pay for a luxury stay and activities.

 

Step 3: Consider the Duration of the Trip

 

 

In order to keep the trip well-organized and under the set budget, it is important to determine the duration of the trip. The ideal vacation should be 4 nights and 5 days but it depends largely on your budget and choice of destination. An incentive holiday to expensive destinations like France or Norway can be kept for a shorter length (weekend) whereas visiting a luxury travel place in Southeast Asia can be vouched for a long holiday (weeklong).

 

Step 4: Decide the Destination

 

 

Well, the point above and this one are interchangeable as both are dependent upon each other. A lavish trip needs to be done at a right place, however, for an incentive tour, you have to be careful with what the destination is offering. You have to ensure that the place is equipped with such activities that can be enjoyed by each member of the team. Nothing too tiring that keeps them on their toes all the time but mostly fun and if possible interactive. To come to think of it, Southeast Asian countries are amongst the best destinations for luxury incentive trips for corporate employees and you can pick from Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and the most important one, Singapore. Other great places to choose from Asia can be India and Dubai. Kerala in India makes for an incredible incentive travel destination as it offers a variety of experiences for your employees, similarly, the concrete jungle of Dubai is no less than a magic land where everything is possible.

 

Step 5: Select a Reliable Travel Company

 

This though is technically the second last step in this blog but certainly, it is the most impox rtant one. Determining early in the plan whether you want to manage the trip internally or outsource to an agency can make things quite clear for further planning. We emphasize on outsourcing it, as it will make things simpler and hassle-free. However, when selecting a corporate incentive travel company, make sure it is capable of fulfilling what is promised for your budgeted cost, and that their cancellation policies are comprehensible. There are a number of MICE travel companies and in case you are in India, Tour My India is one of your best bets.

 

Step 6: Discuss Activity Opportunities and Balanced Itinerary with the Travel Company

 

Although this is the continuation of the step above since it is an important part, and we didn’t want you to overlook it. Apart from discussing the travel package cost and services, it is mandatory to talk it out the opportunities for activities for your incentive team with the chosen travel company. Ensure that the accommodation they are suggested have all possible recreational and adventure activities so that the employees can pick what they like the best. Also, discuss the travel itinerary in advance, as it should have a perfect balance where your employees can enjoy the luxury of the hotel and that of destination at a set time. Employees should also get enough time to relax and do what interests them the most, therefore the tour itinerary should also have some free time slot marked in it.

 

 

By 

 
 
 
https://www.tourmyindia.com/blog/plan-incentive-trip-corporate-employees/
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2 days ago

Fun, Fresh Ideas to Step Up Your Trade Show Game

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Trade shows needn't be all business. The trade show portion of your event is likely a large portion of your revenue. It’s time to level up your trade show game for more return and greater engagement. If your trade show involves people strolling up and down aisles past booths with no meaningful direction to what they’re doing, your attendees and your vendors could do better. There are tons of options out there that you can embrace in order to bring new excitement to your eve...

Trade shows needn't be all business. The trade show portion of your event is likely a large portion of your revenue. It’s time to level up your trade show game for more return and greater engagement.

If your trade show involves people strolling up and down aisles past booths with no meaningful direction to what they’re doing, your attendees and your vendors could do better. There are tons of options out there that you can embrace in order to bring new excitement to your event. Don’t keep doing the same old thing because it’s comfortable. Shake things up. It’s time to take your trade show experience to the next level with these ideas.

 

Level Up Your Trade Show Game:

Guerrilla marketing uses grassroots moments of surprise and delight to get people talking, sharing, and engaging. It can be quite pricey or something done within a budget. This type of marketing has become a showpiece for large brands but with the advent of social media, smaller organizations are embracing it as well.

On the trade show floor, you can use partial reveals to get people talking. For instance, a giant curtain in the center of the exhibition floor that occasionally lets out a roar will get people stopping by to investigate. What’s underneath that curtain is up to you.

The point is to cause curiosity and let people know when they can expect the big reveal. You can bet there will be a crowd there.

 

1. Keys or Puzzle Pieces:

As each attendee files into the trade show floor hand them a key or the other half of something like a puzzle piece. Tell them the lock or other half of their puzzle is hidden somewhere on the trade show floor. People will comb every inch if they think there’s something in it for them.

 

2. Humor:

People love to laugh. Look for opportunities to include humor at your trade show. This could be done easily with strolling characters or you could create “hidden” camera scenarios where something unexpected happens and you record your attendees’ reactions to things. You could even go Facebook Live with some of the scenarios if you have the right type of audience.

 

 

3. Fake News:

Create fake news stories about your sponsors and circulate them on your event app. Everyone loves a good laugh. Just make sure that the stories are so over the top that no one could possibly believe them, we hope.

 

4. Treasure Hunting:

Go live on the trade show floor showcasing not the vendors themselves but the swag. Make the video funny with a treasure hunting theme. Attendees will watch the video and figure out who the vendors are with the incredible swag. In the meantime, they’ll be “hunting” all over your exhibit floor.

 

5. Music:

Some songs are just too good not to jam to. Create a spot on the floor that when people walk by a snippet of a song plays. Use a DJ to create fun, music moments with songs that make an impact. The theme song from the movie Rocky is always a good start. Look for music that puts big smiles on the faces of those who pass.

 

6. Nostalgia:

From toys from childhood to 80s and 90s themes, nostalgia is a big hit and tons of fun. You could require your exhibitors to dress from a past era and ask attendees to vote on the best costume. Host a Back to the Future theme and let exhibitors work with that as they like. Reward and feature creativity.

 

7. Contests on the Floor:

Host mini contests on the floor that are quick to participate in and fun to watch. Ideas include themes based on the popular game, Minute to Win It or Simon Says. Make the prizes worth their time and you’ll not only draw participants in the center of everything but will also give people a reason to come by the floor. Have these mini pop-up contests all over the floor at random times throughout the show.

 

8. Rave:

Safety first but sometimes all you need to freshen up a trade show is some cool lighting. Almost every trade show consists of bright fluorescent lighting. Why not darken the lights and create a rave atmosphere with black lights, glow-in-the-dark jewelry and more? Worried about safety and a dark atmosphere? Then try…

 

9. Let’s Make a Deal:

If you’re old enough you might remember the television show Let’s Make a Deal. On the show, people were given unknown prizes and then were tempted by the host to trade it in for another unknown prize. Sometimes they fared well. Others they went home with goats. Seriously.

But the host also had a mini-game he played just before commercial where he would go up to audience members and ask if they had random objects such as a battery or a tongue depressor with them. You can play this same game with your attendees based on the swag you know exhibitors are giving out. For instance, ask them if they have a stress ball and then offer to trade it for an unknown item behind your back. Award some serious gifts and some funny ones like pocket lint. But for the sake of your vendor, let them keep the stress ball regardless of what they choose.

 

10. Flash Mob:

Create a flash mob just outside your exhibitor hall. Once you have a crowd of people outside of the hall, move your mob’s activities into the hall and people will follow them like children to the Pied Piper.

https://www.eventmanagerblog.com/25-ideas-to-step-up-your-trade-show-game

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2 days ago
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