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Hosting Your Own Trade Show: Planning and Promoting for Profit

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Having a stand at a trade fair is a reasonable way of promoting your business and trying to attract new customers but if you want to really make an impact, hosting your own trade show is the way to go.   Creating a tailor-made setting that casts your products or services in the best possible light is just one of the positive aspects of hosting an exclusive event on your own, so here is a look at how you can set about creating the perfect event.   Reasons for hosting y...

Having a stand at a trade fair is a reasonable way of promoting your business and trying to attract new customers but if you want to really make an impact, hosting your own trade show is the way to go.

 

Creating a tailor-made setting that casts your products or services in the best possible light is just one of the positive aspects of hosting an exclusive event on your own, so here is a look at how you can set about creating the perfect event.

 

There will obviously be costs involved in hosting your own trade show, so you have to look at the reasons why you are doing it and what you hope to get out of the event.

 

The main purpose is likely to be the chance to reach prospective customers without the distraction of competitors around you and if you have a new product or service to launch.

 

A launch event is a very good way of generating publicity and interest and when you use a company, you get the chance to design the exhibition surroundings that will work in the best way for you and what you want to do.

 

If your business provides a service, you might want to consider holding a seminar with some carefully chosen speakers to attract attention and boost attendance figures. Whatever type of business you are involved with the same principle applies, which is that customers often need a good reason to attend, so you have to plan your event around a specific purpose if it is going to be as successful as you want it to be.

 

 

There are a number of specific do’s and don’ts when it comes to planning and hosting a trade show, so here is a checklist of some of the things that you definitely need to do in order to maximise your return from the event itself.

 

1. Make sure you do your research. There is always an element of risk involved in running an event but the rewards can counteract that with ease, so make the effort to establish that there is interest in attending an event based on what you have to offer and how you are planning to present it.

 

2. Set an accurate budget. Costs can easily spiral out of control and spoil the benefits gained if you go over your intended budget for the event. It is sometimes hard to quantify the ROI for an event because the sales may come at a later date rather than directly from the show, but detailing your spend diligently, does allow you to quantify your return.

 

3. Get help where you need it. If you are holding a seminar and need a host or speaker with experience, it would often be better to plan for spending on an expert who will draw a crowd or if you aren’t comfortable with planning a show yourself, consider hiring an event management company to help.

 

4. Maximum effort is required when promoting the show or event. It should be an all-out onslaught with your sales and marketing strategy as well as publicising the event using social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

There are also some don’ts that you want to be aware of if you want to get the most out of your trade show and give it every chance of succeeding.

 

1. Always try to stay on message, which means sticking to your original schedule and plans, as introducing some additional ideas or variations at the wrong time or unnecessarily, could easily create an unwelcome distraction that diverts attention from your original message or purpose.

 

2. Always put the same amount of effort into planning your event, regardless of the scale. Even a low-key event requires meticulous planning and a professional approach for maximum success, so whether you are planning to host 100 or 1000 guests, the same high standards are always needed.

 

3. Try to avoid cutting corners as any attempt to stage an event on the cheap will often be exposed for what it is. This scenario is a lose-lose situation as you are still spending money but reducing your chances of getting a good return and you also run the risk of damaging your company’s reputation.

 

4. The old adage about a job being worth doing well is certainly true when it comes to hosting a trade show, so make sure you take the time and effort to plan it properly.

https://www.business2community.com/marketing/hosting-trade-show-planning-promoting-profit-01181874

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6 hrs ago

Lagos, City Of Hustle, Builds An Art ‘Ecosystem’

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

LAGOS, Nigeria — Cars snaked out from the hideous traffic and deposited the city’s elite, dressed to impress, at the Civic Center, a concrete-and-steel edifice fronting Lagos Lagoon. Women exuding Vogue beauty and power paused on the patio to give television interviews.   Art X Lagos was living up to its reputation as a happening. Not just collectors, but the hip, the curious, the Instagram crowd, thronged West Africa’s principal fair in November. They packed the ...

LAGOS, Nigeria — Cars snaked out from the hideous traffic and deposited the city’s elite, dressed to impress, at the Civic Center, a concrete-and-steel edifice fronting Lagos Lagoon. Women exuding Vogue beauty and power paused on the patio to give television interviews.

 

Art X Lagos was living up to its reputation as a happening. Not just collectors, but the hip, the curious, the Instagram crowd, thronged West Africa’s principal fair in November. They packed the venue to hear the keynote talk by the distinguished British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare, back for the occasion. The Ooni of Ife, a Yoruba king, showed up, escorted by praise-singers. Conversations carried over from gallery openings around town and from the Art Summit, a two-day convening, where the celebrated painter Kehinde Wiley, flown in by the United States consulate, was a special guest.

 

This enormous city — with no official census, population estimates range from 13 million to 21 million — is dynamic by disposition. Yes, the roads are clogged, political corruption is rampant, and the power cuts trigger armies of generators spewing noxious fumes. But Lagosians — who are proud of their “hustle,” a mix of effort, imagination, and brash optimism — will turn any challenge into enterprise. Commerce, music, fashion, have long thrived amid the chaos. And now, with its solid collector base and thickening web of galleries and alternative spaces, the art “ecosystem” — the word everyone uses — is achieving critical mass.

 

Beginning in October, a succession of festivals — devoted to literature, poetry, photography, theater, fashion — cascade into the party-filled holidays. Art X, just three years old, is already a mainstay of this cultural season that has sprung up without any coordination. This fall it will overlap with the Lagos Biennial, a scrappy grass-roots affair that began in 2017.

 

“The city still has that negative reputation,” admitted Tokini Peterside, the founder of Art X and one of the energetic arts entrepreneurs — predominantly women — powering the scene. “We hope to redeem some of that image by providing a good reason for people to come to Lagos. It may have challenges, but it’s a pretty exciting place.”

 

Nigeria has had art movements before — the Zaria Rebels, who unleashed Nigerian modern art in the late 1950s, or the Yoruba modernism of the Osogbo school, to say nothing of sculpture, textile and performance traditions.

 

Recently, Nigerian contemporary artists have found success abroad. Works by the painter Njideka Akunyili-Crosby, based in Los Angeles, have sold for upward of $3 million. The Berlin-based sound and installation artist Emeka Ogboh was a finalist for the Guggenheim Museum’s 2018 Hugo Boss Prize.

 

The Lagos scene, however, joins homegrown artists with those who lived or studied abroad but moved back, inspired to create amid the energy of the city. “You have more people who know they can actually survive as artists,” said Victor Ehikhamenor, a painter and sculptor who returned here from the United States in 2008, somewhat ahead of the curve.

 

Gerald Chukwuma, a Nigerian sculptor in his 40s, showed new work at the fair with the Ghana-based Gallery 1957, which has a Pan-African roster. His theme was Igbo Landing — the story of enslaved people from what is now Nigeria, who, upon disembarking from the Middle Passage in the Sea Islands of Georgia in 1803, walked back into the ocean in their chains rather than submit. Mr. Chukwuma said few Igbo in Nigeria know the story. “We have to retrieve this culture,” he said.

 

At the booth for Artyrama, a Lagos gallery, Ayobola Kekere-Ekun showed paper and textile portraits of Yoruba goddesses as googly-eyed reality-TV stars. Oba, wife of Sango, was persuaded by her conniving co-wife, Osun, to cut off an ear as a show of devotion. “So much drama,” Ms. Kekere-Ekun said. “I found it interesting how Oba was willing to mutilate herself to hold onto her man.”

 

Art X is of comparable scale to the Africa-focused contemporary art fairs 1-54 (held in London, New York and Marrakesh) and AKAA, in Paris. But whereas those fairs address international collectors, Ms. Peterside, who holds an M.B.A. and is the daughter of a prominent banker, began the Lagos event as a cultural investment in the city and a business bet on Nigeria’s burgeoning collector class.

 

In a glamour move, the fair displayed “Tutu,” the 1974 painting by Ben Enwonwu of an Ife princess that disappeared for decades before turning up in a London apartment. It set an auction record for a Nigerian modern work at auction last year, selling for $1.67 million. (The buyer, said to be a collector from Nigeria, remains anonymous.)

 

“Mad Horse City,” a project by the Brooklyn artist Olalekan Jeyifous and the Lagos writer Wale Lawal, invited visitors into a speculative vision of 22nd-century Lagos with a video projection, a graphic novella, and a virtual reality experience. “The first thing was to develop the culture of looking,” Ms. Peterside said. “And go a step further to say that you can play.”

 

GENERATIONAL RENEWAL and art-world globalization are shaking up habits in the Lagos gallery scene. Galleries here traditionally worked with artists in nonexclusive arrangements. Some are tucked away in fancy residences or open by appointment. It made for a small, in-the-know collector base and left artists feeling vulnerable to dealers’ whims.

 

Augury of change came in 2007, when the curator Bisi Silva founded the Center for Contemporary Art, which pioneered contemporary exhibitions and residencies. The next year, Kavita Chellaram, a collector from a prominent Indian business family, opened Nigeria’s first art auction house. Its sales made prices visible for the first time.

 

 Now, young gallerists like Adenrele Sonariwo, at Rele Gallery, and Caline Chagoury, at Art Twenty One, are engaging with their artists’ careers, and encouraging new audiences.

 

“You have to keep inviting younger appreciators,” Ms. Sonariwo said. “You don’t expect them to immediately start collecting or understanding. It has to be a constant thing.”Ms. Sonariwo operates on multiple fronts. She holds an annual Young Contemporaries showcase of artists she scouts herself; this year’s edition is currently on view. In 2017, she was a curator of Nigeria’s first pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

 

 The Art Summit was her initiative as well — an effort, she said, to gather the “ecosystem” around a sense of shared interests, centering on the artists. “At the end of the day this industry exists because of the artists,” Ms. Sonariwo said. “Respecting that, and the artists respecting themselves, was very important to me.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/08/arts/design/lagos-nigeria-art-x-art.html

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1 day ago

NuStreams Conference & Culture Centre

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

At NuStreams Conference Centre, we believe giving your guests a memorable event experience is vital.   Visit us today @NuStreams Conference & Culture Centre,   110 Ibadan Abeokuta Road,   Off Alalubosa GRA/Ibadan.

At NuStreams Conference Centre, we believe giving your guests a memorable event experience is vital.

 

Visit us today @NuStreams Conference & Culture Centre,

 

110 Ibadan Abeokuta Road,

 

Off Alalubosa GRA/Ibadan.

View 44 0
3 days ago

How To Use Social Media To Win At Trade Shows

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Whether you find it exciting or confusing, there’s one thing that’s for sure – social media and trade show marketing go hand in hand. Social media at trade shows is a reality that is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. Social media is no longer just “that thing that kids do on the computer.” What once was simply a place where college students would hang out online is now a digital world  the majority of the global population uses to interact, socia...

Whether you find it exciting or confusing, there’s one thing that’s for sure – social media and trade show marketing go hand in hand. Social media at trade shows is a reality that is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. Social media is no longer just “that thing that kids do on the computer.” What once was simply a place where college students would hang out online is now a digital world  the majority of the global population uses to interact, socialize, learn and be entertained.

 

 Over the last several years, trade show exhibitors have begun to successfully turn to social media platforms to promote their exhibits before, during and after a trade show. With dozens of social media channels available and so many exhibitors competing for attention, using social media to your advantage can be tricky. Effective social media marketing for your  trade show exhibit doesn’t have to be complicated however. In this post, we will provide everything you need to know to navigate the world of social media and use it to boost your trade show booth traffic.

 

1. The Benefit of Social Media for Trade Shows

Social media allows businesses to market towards mass audiences  they never could reach previously. Today, most of the world owns a social media account of some type. Facebook for example, has over 2.2 billion users, and over 1 billion people watch videos on YouTube each month. Social platforms have become tools that consumers depend on – with the majority of users signing into their accounts multiple times per day. For trade show exhibitors, social media is one of the most cost effective ways to make a strong statement while promoting a business, a product, or a brand. A strong social media campaign can benefit your business during a trade show by:

 

There is also one major downfall to not being visible on social media. Likely, your trade show competitors will be doing some type of social media marketing – your absence on social media makes it much easier for them to attract all of the customers!

 

 

2. What Social Media Platforms Should You Use?

There are many social media platforms out there, and it seems that a new one pops up every few months! However, not every platform is right for every business. The social media platforms you should focus on are the ones that your target audience use most. The best strategy isn’t simply just the one that attracts the most people – it’s the one that attracts the most potential customers. Instead of trying to use every social media platform out there, focus on a few that really provide the the best ROI. Here are some popular social media platforms that exhibitors are using currently, and some extremely effective ways they are taking advantage of these platforms.

 

FourSquare

FourSquare is a social network that is completely devoted to locations. On this platform, users can “check in” when they are at a particular location; broadcasting to the world exactly what they are doing at that specific moment. For exhibitors, FourSquare has proven to be perfect for attracting people to trade show booths. Here are a couple ways that exhibitors use FourSquare effectively:

 

Facebook

Facebook is the king of social networks with over 2.2 billion users around the world. Since most of the world is on Facebook, it’s likely you already have a page set up. Facebook is a great platform for businesses to promote their trade show exhibit to a large number of users. Trade show exhibitors have successfully used Facebook to promote their display or business by:

 

In 2017, the Global Pet Expo began implementing social media to market and draw attention to the entire show. One marketing strategy that was extremely successful was the implementation of Facebook Live. Organizers of the show hosted several 10-minute Facebook Live broadcasts during each of the three days of the show. This year, they are planning to add custom Snapchat filters; hoping to add an element of fun to attendees’ posts. In the same way that entire shows are now using Facebook to market events – your business should also be using the platform to draw anticipation to your trade show booth.

 

Twitter

Twitter is a super simple platform that allows users to share message in 140-character posts. The platform uses symbols to make information sharing easy. For example, @username targets a message to a particular user, while #Hashtag allows users to track discussions on a particular topic. Exhibitors have used Twitter to:

 

YouTube

YouTube is the most popular online video-sharing platform, with over a billion active users watching videos each month. This platform allows users to easily upload videos and share them across other social platforms. One way exhibitors have used this platform to their advantage is by recording video during the show on their mobile phone and uploading it instantly to their profile. They also use YouTube to broadcast important events such as announcements, conferences, demonstrations, or other public activities.

 

 

3.Promoting Your Exhibit With Social Media

Without a doubt, your business will benefit greatly from implementing a great social media strategy. Like any other marketing effort, your social media campaign needs to be meticulously planned; it’s not something that can simply be made up as you go along. Proper social media promotion has a long term effect – it’s not only effective during the show, but can also be used to drive attention to your brand before and after the show.

 

 

4. What To Do Before The Show

Weeks before the show begins, you should start showcasing your business’ upcoming trade show participation. Here’s are some strategies that any business can use to maximize their social media potential for an upcoming show:

 

 

5. Promoting on Social Media During The Show

During the show, you can use social media to attract show visitors to your exhibit. Visitors often use social media on their smartphones as they are navigating through a trade show; and if you can reach them while they are at the show, you will drastically improve your chances of getting them into your booth.

 

 

6. Marketing Through Social Media After The Show

Shows may end, but social media allows us to connect with show attendees even long after the end of the show. A few of the most effective ways of doing so is to:

 

 

7. Making The Most Of Your Social Media Campaign

The key to making social media work for your trade show is to be consistent and patient. Like any marketing effort, creating the perfect strategy is a trial-and-error experience. If one effort doesn’t pan out the way you thought it would, figure out why it didn’t work, and move on to the next. As you optimize your social media campaign, you will find that focusing on social media can have a tremendous benefit for attracting traffic to your booth.

 

Here’s the caveat – once you attract consumers, you want to send them to a booth or a display that really blows them away.

https://american-image.com/how-to-use-social-media-to-win-at-trade-shows/

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5 days ago

What to Know Before You Choose The Menu for Your Event

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

When it comes to the guests' enjoyment of any event, food and beverage are nearly as important to an event as the purpose of the event itself. As the event planner, you will likely be responsible for working with the catering professional to plan the food right down to selecting each menu item for your group.   Planning the Event Menu: Whether you're working with a private caterer or the catering manager at the event venue itself, it's always helpful to consider seve...

When it comes to the guests' enjoyment of any event, food and beverage are nearly as important to an event as the purpose of the event itself. As the event planner, you will likely be responsible for working with the catering professional to plan the food right down to selecting each menu item for your group.

 

Planning the Event Menu:

Whether you're working with a private caterer or the catering manager at the event venue itself, it's always helpful to consider several factors before building the menu. The first thing to remember is that the menu options they present are almost always 100% flexible. And even though most caterers will allow you to confirm the menu and headcount about three weeks prior to the event, confirm the menu much earlier in the planning process. Here's what you need to know before you get started.

 

 

Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner Menus:

The menu should include several pre-packaged meal options and à la carte selections developed by the executive chef or caterer. The approach to the different meals of the day is generally unique. Consider the following:

 

Breakfast: When it comes to breakfast, packaged menus are usually more cost-effective and easier to select, including continental options, hot buffets, and breakfast stations. If you're offering breakfast prior to the start of the official program, be sure to choose the option that best suits your event's schedule.

 

Lunch: Most caterers offer several lunch buffet options, "working lunch" choices (such as à la carte sandwiches and appropriate sides), and even boxed lunches. Again, the best choice of meal type will be entirely depending on your program's schedule so consider how much time guests will have to eat.

 

Dinner: You always have a choice of packaged dinner buffets or plated dinners, and both can offer a choice of three to five courses. This is where you will find items that reflect the executive chef's personal preferences and is also generally a time to let the food shine.

 

 

Break Foods and Reception Menus:

When it comes to planning the food at an event, the planning is not always limited to three square meals. In fact, many multi-day conferences require catering planning beyond breakfast, lunch, and dinner perhaps during scheduled breaks or breakfast and cocktail receptions. The executive chef or caterer may present you with several more pre-packaged meal options as well as à la carte selections:

 

Break Items: If your budget can afford it, theme breaks are always more interesting than standard beverages and snacks.

 

Receptions: Most caterers offer à la carte options for passed chilled and hot hors-d'oeuvres and hosted bar reception packages (charged hourly per person or on consumption). They also may offer cold and hot platter stations as well as dessert stations.

 

 

The Big Dinner Question: Buffet or Plated?

The following time considerations should serve as a good guide to determine how best to serve the meal:

 

Plated: Plated meals require at least 1.5 hours, if not 2 hours, of agenda time to properly serve and clean the room. Plated meal service is most commonly used for dinner and relaxed senior executive meetings.

 

Buffet: Try to allow up to 1 hour of agenda time for any buffet meal. Buffets are a great format for breakfast and lunch.

 

Passed Items: While a great option for hors-d'oeuvres, passing serving is typically only used during receptions.

 

 

Special Needs Considerations:

Last, but not least of the menu planning considerations is taking into account special dietary needs. It is critical to incorporate and notify your catering manager about any special requests and needs that your guests may have, including, but not limited to:

 

The only way to know about such special needs is to ask, and the only way to plan for them is to discuss them with your catering professional as soon as possible.

 

 

Completing a Banquet Event Order:

The banquet event order is the formal write-up that details all elements of your catering needs once you've gone through all the considerations and planning steps above. It will require your signature (as the event planner), so carefully review this document for accuracy because both you and the caterer will refer to it later. It will include the following decisions, requests, and requirements:

BY ROB HARD

https://www.thebalancesmb.com/what-to-know-before-you-choose-the-menu-for-your-event-1223511

 

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6 days ago

Title: IBADAN GYS 2020

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article by Babatunde Kujore in

Title: IBADAN GYS 2020   Topic: Guarantee Your Success with e-trading   Date:  Friday & Saturday 17th & 18th, January 2020   Time:  11 AM   Venue: NuStreams Conference & Culture Centre

Title: IBADAN GYS 2020

 

Topic: Guarantee Your Success with e-trading

 

Date:  Friday & Saturday 17th & 18th, January 2020

 

Time:  11 AM

 

Venue: NuStreams Conference & Culture Centre

View 51 0
6 days ago
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